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lightfan

Getting started

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Im not sure where to begin, i have downloaded the demo but theres not a lot i can do or even open, can someone help me with where to begin
Thanks

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Take a look at Bob's Videos ... they will give you some idea of what you can do in the software. http://forums.lightorama.com/forum95/28633.html

Also, click on the Help file (located in the Sequence Editor), as it has a wealth of information in there about the LOR software. You can also click the Help File on the Software Download page: http://www.lightorama.com/SoftwareDownloadPage.html

There is a lot of information there ...

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I'm just beginning my second year. First of all, I'd say that you've taken a VERY important first step. You've started early. With all the "learning" I did from last January until I lit up my show Thanksgiving weekend last year, I can't imagine starting late and still getting it up and running. Some have done it successfully, but not many.

Second, I'd suggest you read, read, read. Read the S3 software user's manual, per Don's link above. Read the forum regularly. Even the stuff you think won't interest you. You'll likely learn something new in almost every post. It's likely you'll be working on something 6 months from now and remember "...hey there was a forum post on that subject; I'm gonna go check that out again..."

Third, if you can afford it, buy one controller now and start playing with it. I'm a very visual person, so when I can actually "see" how it works, I remember it much better.

Fourth, pick songs you like. You're going to be hearing them a lot. Over and over and over as you're sequencing them. Maybe as many as 100 times or more.

Fifth, check out some display videos from all the great folks on this forum. There are tons of good ones out there. And do your setup and sequences in a way that you enjoy it. If you think it looks good, so will your "viewers." If you're like most of us, you'll be your own worst critic. What you see as a bad timing or poor section of your sequence won't even be detected by your audience (unless your audience is made up of a bunch of LOR users.)

Finally, enjoy yourself. This can be a lot of fun. Or it can be a job. If it starts to feel like the latter, step away from it for a few weeks and come back with a fresh attitude.

Welcome to the madness. It's good to have another member on board.

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I like would like to buy the kit and build a controller, I have some electronic experience, any thoughts on the kit verse the already assembled controller,
Thanks for all the help

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Just remember there's no 'light sequencers anonymous', so if you get in too deep, you're not going to get support from here on how to break the habit. We're all hooked on this and we wouldn't know how to quit even if we wanted to.

Although that's somewhat tongue-in-cheek, it's pretty accurate. You won't stop with one controller. As soon as you get your first test lights to go blinkie-blinkie, you're hooked! It's like a drug habit (you even see the same pretty lights) .. and it hits your pocketbook just about as hard.

Of course you're a little confused right now. You have a sequencer and are staring at a blank page. Okay, I've got it ... now what?

Aaron is giving good advice ... get a controller and start learning to do something with it. If you haven't done soldering in a while, you might get a preassembled version so you'll have a guide as to how it looks when it's done correctly.

You might also consider downloading a sequence that someone has created (and is willing to share). That way you'll see the techniques he or she uses to create a sequence. It'll help you get a jump start on learning to use the sequencer and how it looks on the grid.

The grid .. that's where it all happens. You want this channel to do this (turn on, fade up, fade down, etc) at this point in time. Simple in concept, but you'll be listening to the music over and over and over to get it to turn on/off, etc, at the correct point in sync with the music.

Welcome to the madness. Hope you have a high limit Visa card to buy more controllers, 'cause like Lays Potato Chips, you can't have just one.

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LOL well im eager to start learning , and i guess ready to drain the wallet

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The learning takes some time, what you see on youtube is hours, some even years of work. The wallet, you might as well just kiss it goodbye.

Welcome to the fun, my best advice for a new person is read! Just run through the forums to what people have asked and just read. You will gain so much from things that have already been asked and did not realize you wanted to know!

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Thanks its great to know i have some help getting the ball rolling

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I would like to build 4 smaller arches, meaning each 1 10' section of pvc, does anyone have an idea on how many lights would be enough for each arch
Thanks

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Keep in mind this is going to be my first year but the arch i bult with my daughter consisted of 8 sleeves of red incandescents (100 ct incan mini's). I will have 4 arches for xmas this year and all will be LED. I have purchased 8 G3 controllers, and read this forum at least 5 times a week. Read, Read, and Read some more. And ask questions, no matter what someone will always try to answer. Chris

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8 arches / (1) 10 ft pvc pipe- 800 mini incans. Each sleeve approximately 14.5 inches in length.

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Plenty of good intro videos here: http://www.lightorama.com/Documentation.html#Quick_Start_Guides

It is for the previous versions of the software, but all the basics are the same. The main differences with the newer version is more advanced features that you will move onto later (and can learn about in Bob's referenced videos above).

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Thanks for all the help, now what do i do for an amp from the computer to the speakers , i havent been able to determin what i need, anyone have any thought on this subject

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lightfan wrote:

Thanks for all the help, now what do i do for an amp from the computer to the speakers , i havent been able to determin what i need, anyone have any thought on this subject

Most use a FM transmitter so visitors can hear the music on their car radios.

www.edmdesign.com

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Thanks as a beginner i just want to run some outside speakers , maybe move to the fm transmitter next year

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lightfan wrote:

Thanks as a beginner i just want to run some outside speakers , maybe move to the fm transmitter next year

To be honest, from a ease of use standpoint, a FM transmitter is easier to do. No wires to run and speakers to place. (And no neighbors to annoy.) Can always tune a radio outdoors to your station then and have speakers out there that way if so desired.

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I run a transmitter and a stereo outside tuned to my station, can't pass up an opportunity to annoy my neighbors

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