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jimswinder

CCB's + CCR's = Less Controllers

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IF and when the CCB's are ready for purchase this year, I am looking at possibly using 9 less controllers (144 Channels) and 10,000 less lights this year...even though I am adding about 6 new elements to my display.

Is anyone else going this direction due to an increase in your use of CCR's and CCB's?

Yea, I know...ya all will do me a big favor and take my extra lights and controllers off my hands...

You guys are the best!!! :)

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I'm considering changing my 40' mega arches to CCBs. That would free up 48 channels and 4800 lights.

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jimswinder wrote:

IF and when the CCB's are ready for purchase this year, I am looking at possibly using 9 less controllers (144 Channels) and 10,000 lights this year...even though I am adding about 6 new elements to my display.

Is anyone else going this direction due to an increase in your use of CCR's and CCB's?

Yea, I know...ya all will do me a big favor and take my extra lights and controllers off my hands...

You guys are the best!!! :)
Me too I am waiting for something come out I put all mini light off and go for RGB and RGB pixel I am go to need few board for RBG pixel, faster I can get them faster start to work with them .I hope new software LOR come out few month before Halloween I go to need few new setting before intalle everything on I looking to spent few $$$$ this years :D:D

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jimswinder wrote:

Is anyone else going this direction due to an increase in your use of CCR's and CCB's?


Forgive me for being a doubting George, but I think your math is slightly flawed. Looks to me like you're going to have even more controllers in your yard this year. Or aren't you counting the CCR and CCB controllers as controllers?

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George Simmons wrote:

Forgive me for being a doubting George, but I think your math is slightly flawed. Looks to me like you're going to have even more controllers in your yard this year. Or aren't you counting the CCR and CCB controllers as controllers?

LOL...of course my math is flawed George!!!

I was ACTUALLY thinking of total channels...and no, I for one, won't count the 157 channels per string/ribbon in my channel count... ;)

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jimswinder wrote:

...and no, I for one, won't count the 157 channels per string/ribbon in my channel count...  ;)


For what it's worth, neither do I. In my mind a CCR is fifty channels because that's how many I'm sequencing. (I don't use macros)

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would love to replace the mega tree (16 strings) and eve line with all RGB's (65' maybe 2 string there)

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if anyone wants to get rid of some of those pesky extra controllers, I can take them off your hands :P

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Jim Saul wrote:

if anyone wants to get rid of some of those pesky extra controllers, I can take them off your hands ;)

I need mine to go to a nice warm climate...not somewhere where there is still snow on the ground and then have my controllers subjected to 50 - 70 mph winds!!! :P

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jimswinder wrote:


I need mine to go to a nice warm climate...not somewhere where there is still snow on the ground and then have my controllers subjected to 50 - 70 mph winds!!!  :P

LOL Me too!
by the way, the rebar that each of the nativity wise men are tied to is bent now too!

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jimswinder wrote:

Jim Saul wrote:
if anyone wants to get rid of some of those pesky extra controllers, I can take them off your hands ;)

I need mine to go to a nice warm climate...not somewhere where there is still snow on the ground and then have my controllers subjected to 50 - 70 mph winds!!! :P

Send em down to sweet home Alabama and I will give them a nice warm (and humid) home.

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jimswinder wrote:

Jim Saul wrote:
if anyone wants to get rid of some of those pesky extra controllers, I can take them off your hands :P

I need mine to go to a nice warm climate...not somewhere where there is still snow on the ground and then have my controllers subjected to 50 - 70 mph winds!!! :)

Well that actually leaves Florida out! No Snow, but if we get a hurricane during hurricane season, we may or could possibly get winds up to 150+mph! Bye bye controller unless it's really mounted down and even then, if the house goes and their mounted on a wall, still Bye bye controllers. Ah well....:)

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I am adding arches this year and was going to use 7 channels per arch.

4 arches would be 2 controllers plus lights ...ummm LED run $10 plus each times 28 is over $280 for each colour.

I thought I would use the CCR to make 2 arches but wife said they would be too small and use one for each!

Who am I to argue?

I love my wife :D

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CKSedg wrote:

What a woman! She's a keeper!

I KNOW!!!! : )

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Guest Don Gillespie

jimswinder wrote:

IF and when the CCB's are ready for purchase this year, I am looking at possibly using 9 less controllers (144 Channels) and 10,000 less lights this year...even though I am adding about 6 new elements to my display.

Is anyone else going this direction due to an increase in your use of CCR's and CCB's?




I am only a day late with this thread but my thinking is the same as yours Jim, my plan is to use either the CCRs on the roof lines this year or the CCBs that would free up enough channels to operate my trees in RGB also with possiblity of some M-5 leds to outline the trees

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Jim Saul wrote:

if anyone wants to get rid of some of those pesky extra controllers, I can take them off your hands ;)
I should was 2 3 on sale went my new board for pixel are in keep my aadresse check in 1 mouth I have I HAVE HARD TIME FINE SOME BOARD for my light RGB Pixel:cool:

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Orville wrote:



Well that actually leaves Florida out! No Snow, but if we get a hurricane during hurricane season, we may or could possibly get winds up to 150+mph! Bye bye controller unless it's really mounted down and even then, if the house goes and their mounted on a wall, still Bye bye controllers. Ah well....;)

If that ever happened I would not be thinking of my controllers.......I would be saying "Its a great day to be alive"

I need to ask this question. On regular LED light strings LEDs do burn out. So my question is ...... do they or can they burn out on these CCR's?

If they ever did would it look crappy with a gap between lights?

Just curious.

Most of my house stays static anyways and all you can see is the peak. So I was thinking that those CCR's might look good just on that spot. If they are 8ft long I would need 6 of them. Or use the new CCB's when they arrive.

I cannot let PaulChristmas be alone up in this neck of the woods. :D

On the other hand that may need to be a 2012 goal .......ah we shall see.

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lightzilla wrote:

Most of my house stays static anyways and all you can see is the peak. So I was thinking that those CCR's might look good just on that spot. If they are 8ft long I would need 6 of them. Or use the new CCB's when they arrive.



CCR's are 16'4" each..so 3 should do ! You should get from 30,000 to 50,000 hours of life from them.

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Ron Amedee wrote:

lightzilla wrote:
Most of my house stays static anyways and all you can see is the peak. So I was thinking that those CCR's might look good just on that spot. If they are 8ft long I would need 6 of them. Or use the new CCB's when they arrive.



CCR's are 16'4" each..so 3 should do ! You should get from 30,000 to 50,000 hours of life from them.


Ahh, but no two LEDs are really truly identical, therefore, one may fail long before its cousin next to it. This is why I prefer "replaceable" LED strings over sealed, because I have had LED's burn out or go bad and need to replace one or more. Last year on a string that was just 1 year old I replaced a LED on it 7 times due to a LED failure, when tested outside the string, it had died and had a lot less than those hours on it.

I still think these failures are from over-voltages or inherrent spikes getting into the LED and through the string via the elctronics used to convert the AC to a DC current in these strings, and some LEDs are just weaker than others, so as they age (they get weaker in electrical characteristics), they fail (burn out) from just a small over-voltage cycle. I've never ran any tests to confirm this, but think this is the main problem with some LED light strings. I have other LED strings now going on 3 years and have never had an issue or a burn out (yet) of an LED on them.



So that's one thing I keep thinking about too on the CCR's, or any type of RGB/RGBW LED. As I've even had those RGBW types that have built in color cycling chips like you find in toys or other knick-knack/attnetion getting type applications that are battery operated fail, that is out of the RGBW LED, one of these internal LEDs have failed, it could be the Red, White, Blue or Green. Most often in these type applications the LED that failed is the one that usually requires the most voltage to light, usually the Blue or the White LED fail (just won't light inside the encapsulant). And since these are internally microchipped (which is the controller to make the "color changing" LED function), there is no way to test the LED itself to actually see if the LED failed or has a part of the controller (IC) failed to function?

So I have seen SMD fail, which is what are used in CCR's. So, it is possible that one or even more of them could fail on the CCR strip.

One time, long ago, it was always thought an LED would never burn out, and would last indefinitely, today we have rated hours on LED's. Yet, I have some in model trains that have far surpassed the 50,000 hour mark on them and they are still going strong today. Makes me wonder if the "old LED's" from years ago were built to higher and better standards than the ones we buy today?!?

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No whites just RGB Red Green Blue.

I think all on makes white

rgb(100%,100%,100%)

rgb(0%,0%,0%) black

rgb(100%,40%,0%) orange

rgb(100%,100%,0%) yellow

rgb(0%,50%,0%) green

rgb(0%,0%,100%) blue

rgb(0%,100%,100%) aqua

rgb(50%,50%,50%) gray

rgb(0%,100%,0%) lime

rgb(50%,0%,50%) purple

I would assume if one goes out the other 2 will light.
Public may not see it.

It would take 7 to do my house (and windows).

Something for 2012 maybe....

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The true name of the color for "rgb(0%,100%,100%)" is CYAN,
and for rgb(100%,0%,100%)---which you didn't list--- it would be MAGENTA.

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In 3 color process..I owned a tee shirt printing buisness years ago'''

The CMYK color model (process color, four color) is a subtractive color model, used in color printing, and is also used to describe the printing process itself. CMYK refers to the four inks used in some color printing: cyan, magenta, yellow, and key (black). Though it varies by print house, press operator, press manufacturer and press run, ink is typically applied in the order of the abbreviation.

The “K” in CMYK stands for key since in four-color printing cyan, magenta, and yellow printing plates are carefully keyed or aligned with the key of the black key plate. Some sources suggest that the “K” in CMYK comes from the last letter in "black" and was chosen because B already means blue.[1][2] However, this explanation, though plausible and useful as a mnemonic, is incorrect.[3]

The CMYK model works by partially or entirely masking colors on a lighter, usually white, background. The ink reduces the light that would otherwise be reflected. Such a model is called subtractive because inks “subtract” brightness from white.

In additive color models such as RGB, white is the “additive” combination of all primary colored lights, while black is the absence of light. In the CMYK model, it is the opposite: white is the natural color of the paper or other background, while black results from a full combination of colored inks. To save money on ink, and to produce deeper black tones, unsaturated and dark colors are produced by using black ink instead of the combination of cyan, magenta and yellow.

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You are correct. I know a little about printing, since I have been in the business for over 35 years.

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