Jump to content
Light-O-Rama Forums

hasslerk

Members
  • Content Count

    16
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

2 Neutral

About hasslerk

  • Rank
    New Forum User

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Leesburg, VA
  • Occupation
    Engineer

More About Me

  • Interests
    Light Shows, Model Trains, RC Airplanes & Drones, Old Cars
  • How I learned about Light-O-Rama -
    Internet research
  • Favorite Decorating Holiday?
    Halloween

LOR Software

  • LOR Software Version
    5.2.2
  • License Level
    Pro
  1. I apologize. My post last night to rphelps68 about how I setup my dumb RGB lights/strips was incorrect. I crossed my thoughts between S4 and S5. What I described was how I configured them in S4. In S5, the channel configuration is done in the prop definition. Refreshing my brain this morning, it took me a while and few trial and error mouse clicks to see how to set them to a specific color. Seems like it may be more mouse clicks in S5 than it used to be in S4, but I guess that is progress. I need to start porting my Halloween show over to S5, so I am sure I will learn more and hopefully some shortcuts.
  2. Jack, I just realized I missed your post. It came in while I was on business travel overseas. Thanks for your inputs. My wireless light linkers are only used to get out to my mega tree in the yard, which utilizes an AC controller (CTB16PCg3) and is on a "regular" network defined as 57.6K. Since everything on this network are only AC controllers, I did not feel I needed a higher speed. All my RGB dumb strips, spots and leaping arches are on the other "enhanced" network, set to run at 500k. This year I will be adding at least two more colors to my LED mega tree. I know it is probably easier to convert to pixels, but I have the lights and extra AC controllers so why not. I plan to use the "LED mounting strips for M5 faceted lens" from Boscoyo Studios to create a nice red, green, blue vertical spacing (and maybe white). Best of luck with S5. Cheers, Kurt Woodlea Hills Lights
  3. I have the RGB spot lights that uplight on the house as well as the dumb LED strip along the bottom of the facia, and the leaping arches. I will talk through both types. For the RGB spots (both 10W and 50W) and the dumb LED strips, I have three channels identified for each "light" or strip (red, green and blue). I then "mix" them to get the color I want. It took a while to mix the colors to get the desired tint of orange that I use for halloween; Christmas is a lot easier color wise. The 10W lights (x6) and dumb LED strips (x2) are driven by a CMB24D, and the two 50W floods are standalone as their own controller units. The leaping arches (smart pixels) were much harder, as I was new to them as well as the new S5 software. First off these lights and controller came as a set from Holidaycoro. But due to my changing to S5 between seasons I had to set aside the alphapix (DMX) controller that came with it and replace it with a pixie4 from LOR. I did not have the time to figure out the conversion from LOR to DMX, and for a reasonable amount of money that problem went away using the pixie4. But it was still a hassle programming them (again, new to it). To get the arches to work, I used the effects generator in S5, which for arches seems somewhat limited, as I think it is really meant more for pixel trees. But I managed to get the moving effects I wanted. To be honest, I could never seem to be able to program them to all just come on a solid color using the effects generator or by manipulating the channels. The only way I could get the leaping arches to all light up as one color was to create the color I wanted against some other traditional channel and then cut/paste it into the leaping arches channels. It was a brute force method but it worked in the time frame I had. I hope this year to get more familiar with those aspects of controlling pixels. Hope this helps. And thanks for the compliment! Cheers, Kurt Woodlea Hills Lights
  4. This is my latest version of Let It Go by Indina Menzel. I posted a minimal version of this out here back in 2015 when I was first starting out. One of the comments back then was that I should use 50 watt RGB floods on the house: Done! I keep this in the show every year as it is a big hit with the kids. This show is made up of a little more than 8000 lights, utilizing 9 LOR controllers (5xCTB16PCg3, 1xCMB24D, 1xPixie4, and 2x50W RGB floods) and 294 channels. The CMB24D drives the dumb RGB LED strips on the foundation for uplighting, as well as 6x10W RGB floods. The Pixie4 drives the arches. All lights are LED, except for the strobes. The mega tree is my original prop first displayed in 2015, and the rest of the show has grown around it every year since. This year the mega tree is driven by an Easy Light Linker (wireless), which worked out very well. You can check out my post on the forum about what I had to do to get the show running after upgrading from S4 to S5 (5.2.2 pro) after Thanksgiving. Other videos can be found on YouTube or Facebook by searching for "Woodlea Hills Lights". Hope you enjoy!
  5. This is my version of The Greatest Show, using Panic! At the Disco's version. This show is made up of a little more than 8000 lights, utilizing 9 LOR controllers (5xCTB16PCg3, 1xCMB24D, 1xPixie4, and 2x50W RGB floods) and 294 channels. The faces were all sequenced by me, as well as the rest of the choreography. The CMB24D drives the dumb RGB LED strips on the foundation for uplighting, as well as 6x10W RGB floods. The Pixie4 drives the arches. All lights are LED, except for the strobes. The mega tree is my original prop first displayed in 2015, and the rest of the show has grown around it every year since. This year the mega tree is driven by an Easy Light Linker (wireless), which worked out very well. You can check out my post on the forum about what I had to do to get the show running after upgrading from S4 to S5 (5.2.2 pro) after Thanksgiving. Other videos can be found on YouTube or Facebook by searching for "Woodlea Hills Lights". Hope you enjoy!
  6. Contrary to all opinions out here, I went and upgraded from S4 to S5 (5.2.2) after Thanksgiving in an attempt to incorporate a Pixie4 controller and some pixel arches. After two weeks of fighting with a defunct show, scrounging these forums for someone with my similar setup and problems, learning the intricacies of the S5 software and the integrated preview design, and a lot of late nights with trial and error, I finally reached success with S5 last weekend. Under S4, I used a G3-MP3 director and 8 controllers; 5xCTB16PCg3, 1xCMB24D, 2x50 Watt RGB floods, 2 wireless Light Linkers, and the show worked flawlessly. The same show created via S5 without the pixie4 configured in would only light up one CTB16PCg3. Everything looked like it should work in Preview, and there were no errors denoted. After a number of days, I finally did the following: 1. Verify all controllers are actually 3rd generation (g3), which they were 2. Check, and then upgrade all firmware. Sure enough, once I upgraded all the firmware to the latest revisions (which LOR HW Utility make very easy), a significant amount of the show started to work in S5 from the G3-MP3, but still not everything. A check of my cat-5e connectivity made me realize that devices on "Net 2" of the G3-MP3 director were not working. This was partly due to my misunderstanding of how to enable Net 2 in the HW Utility when creating the show, partly the type of devices on that link, partly due to my misconfiguration of "Aux A" in the Network editor (had not set it to "enhanced") and my misuse of it in the Sequence editor and Preview. Basically what I did to fix everything was place anything "pixel" on "Aux A" in the Preview, and anything not pixel on Regular, and making sure the Cat 5e cabling matched. When using the G3-MP3, NET 1 would be the "regular" network, and Net 2 would be "Aux A" and set to 500k. To expand, when setting up a show via HW Utility, in step 3 make sure to select the box for "SD Card is for a Generation 3 or Newer Director", and then select "2" for number of ports. The next screen will tell you that Port 1 will be for a regular network and Port 2 will be for Aux A network. On Step 5 keep the "Strip MP3 Header" selected. On Step 6 for the Port 1, select "57.6 (normal)", and in this step I chose to de-select "Output LOR enhanced channels as well as LOR normal (if available)". Pressing "Next" takes you to step 6 setup for Port 2, which I select 500K. Creating the show with these selections and with the correct devices on each "Net" worked flawlessly. I could now add in the pixie4 which set me off in this direction to begin with. So one thing is for sure, S5 is way less forgiving than S4, at least in my original setup. I had firmware issues, props misconfigured in preview, and cabling errors, but in the end none of it was errors with the S5 software itself. After all this, I am happy I made the change to S5, and really like the consolidated interface and interaction. I am still learning how to edit pixels, but for this season the pixel arches have some basic features to keep it entertaining. Next year I hope to step it up to the next level. Hope this helps someone... Kurt Woodlea Hills Lights
  7. Okay, so I replied too soon. Once I downloaded the proper DLL to do the actual mp3 conversion the "option" button appeared. Going through the import/export process fixed my problem.
  8. drmoon68 - Thanks for the audacity idea. I noticed that I added a new sequence (on Christmas) and no matter where I place it in the show, the first couple seconds of the sequence starts before the music, and then seems to reset and then get in sync. I had already down sampled to 128kbps from 248 using iTunes, but it did not seem to make a difference. I downloaded audacity using your link above to the PC that I use for show creation, but cannot find exactly where I set the 128 and constant bit rate. Under preferences "quality" all I get is settings for low, medium, high and best, and dither settings.
  9. Here is a sequence we did to "Let It Go", the main theme song from Frozen. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHKhFP5NXTE This is an upgrade over what we did last year in that we switched to LED lights which are much brighter, and which caused us to add 4' to the pole since the light strings are longer (last years was 10'). We also added "dumb" LED strips along the house to add up-lighting to the face of the house. The overall length of the main pole is 16', but 2' is buried in the ground. For the basis of the tree, we followed the 2x4 wood method as outlined by YouTube user amx4perry, posted Nov 30, 2009. The only difference is that we painted all our wood flat black. This show has three controllers; one (1) 16 channel Light-O-Rama residential controller (CTB16PC) for the tree, one (1) 24 channel "dumb" pixel controller (CMB24D) for the LED strips, and one (1) Showtime Central add-on, which plays the sequences from an SD card via the mini-Director and broadcasts the music via the FM transmitter. This means I did not have to use a computer or run a Cat5 cable out to the tree to make it work, or setup speakers that would annoy the neighbors. Lights for this year are all LED Christmas lights from Holiday Light Express. Channel colors are as follows: Chan 1: White Chan 2 - 5: Blue Chan 6: White Chan 7 - 10: Blue Chan 11: White Chan 12 - 15: Blue Chan 16: White light ball on top of tree The LED strips are "dumb" weather-proof RGB strips from Amazon. Each side of the house has two strips connected in series. To control them, I use the first 8 channels of the 24 channel controller (power, red, green and blue). For this song I only use the blue, but for Halloween I mixed the RGB to create other colors. Video was shot using my Android Droid Turbo, and edited using iMovie to remove the background noise and to add the soundtrack. Enjoy.
  10. Enjoy my first attempt at sequencing the singing pumpkin from Holidaycoro. I set it to Uma Thurman by Fall Out Boy. https://youtu.be/M7g2LZNuwRk I started by sequencing the 8 small pumpkins, which I think is the easiest. Then worked on the pumpkin outline, then eyes. The mouth movement is what took the longest at 8+ hours. I found I got better at it as I went, and ended up going back to the beginning and re-sequencing some parts. Most of the sequencing was done at 1/4 speed so that I could discern the various syllables from the music track in the waveform. Most pop music repeats itself, so I was able to pretty much cut and paste various parts to other parts within the track. The video was shot using my Android phone, imported in to iMovie, and overlayed with the audio used in the actual display. My first attempt at sequencing was last Christmas, which I did a 16 string tree set to Let it Go from Frozen (https://youtu.be/XCNl_hYYkBs). Enjoy.
  11. Here is my second sequence, set to Let It Go from Frozen. If someone can please give me an idea how best to video this, please feel free to comment. I used a GoPro Hero3, set to 720, 60 FPS, and Narrow FOV. It appears to have a hard time adjusting to flashing lights, and then YouTube does another layer of processing when I upload it. What is lost in translation is all the smooth transitions from dark to light and back. For the basis of the tree, we followed the 2x4 wood method as outlined by YouTube user amx4perry, posted Nov 30, 2009. The only difference is that we painted all our wood flat black. We have one (1) 16 channel Light-O-Rama residential controller, and one (1) Showtime Central add-on, which plays the sequences from an SD card via the mini-Director and broadcasts the music via the FM transmitter (you all know this, but for other newbies...). This means I did not have to use a computer or run a Cat5 cable out to the tree to make it work, or setup speakers that would annoy the neighbors. Lights for this year are all standard (aka cheap) Christmas lights from Home Depot. Channel colors are as follows:Chan 1: WhiteChan 2 - 5: BlueChan 6: WhiteChan 7 - 10: BlueChan 11: WhiteChan 12 - 15: BlueChan 16: White light ball on top of tree My first sequence, set to Ho Hey by the Lumineers was previously posted out here on this forum. Enjoy.
  12. This is my first year (actually first couple weeks) with the residential 16-channel controller. Shortly after receiving it and playing around with the S3 software I realized I was going to need the Showtime Central (and so the obsession begins). The nice parts of the Showtime Central are: 1) it only requires a Cat5 connection to a controller; no other power required. 2) I did not have to run a LONG Cat5 cable out to the controller. 3) The FM transmitter works great (once you find a non-interfering freq to set it to). 4) The miniDirector and FM transmitter are mounted inside a weather resistant case (just like the controller)...all of which makes it extremely easy to install and use. Given how long it took us to sequence our first song (Ho Hey by the Lumineers), I bought the SD card of Christmas music/sequences off the site and they work fine. As mentioned above, you can modify them and the entire show. My personal opinion is that since these are sequenced to royalty-free music, I may not use them much past this year as they are not the "recognized" versions that everyone knows. But given my short time frame of setting all this up it is good enough for this season. As for how long it takes, our sequence took us about 4 hours (a lot of which was just figuring out the tools available). I agree with the comment above that this will get easier the more we use it. You can see what I did by searching the forum for "Newbie 10' 16-Channel Straight Mega Tree".
  13. All, I want to thank all of you out here and on YouTube that helped me figure out how to do this. The video can be viewed at This is our very first entry in to Light-O-Rama products, and figured that this is a learning year (season) for us. For the basis of the tree, we followed the 2x4 wood method as outlined by YouTube user amx4perry, posted Nov 30, 2009. The only difference is that we painted all our wood flat black. We have one (1) 16 channel Light-O-Rama residential controller, and one (1) Showtime Central add-on, which plays the sequences from an SD card via the mini-Director and broadcasts the music via the FM transmitter (you all know this, but for other newbies...). This means I did not have to use a computer or run a Cat5 cable out to the tree to make it work, or setup speakers that would annoy the neighbors. Lights for this year are all standard (aka cheap) Christmas lights from Home Depot. Channel colors are as follows:Chan 1: WhiteChan 2 - 5: BlueChan 6: WhiteChan 7 - 10: BlueChan 11: WhiteChan 12 - 15: BlueChan 16: White light ball on top of tree This is our very first sequence, and is set to Ho Hey by the Lumineers. Enjoy.
×
×
  • Create New...