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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/04/2018 in all areas

  1. GriswoldStyle

    New to RGB. New power supply emitting strange smell

    Can you explain a little bit more by what you mean never run them over 80%? Do you mean amp wise or intensity wise in the sequence? Sorry to ask for clarification but this is my first year dabbing into RGB with a CMB. I would like to be able to reference back to any information provided to help me continue further into the addiction.
  2. I just happen to think that power supplies are a crap shoot anyway. I understand that everybody swears by Mean Well but I have over 30 power supplies in my system and I for one can't afford $50 a pop for a Mean Well. All of my power supplies have cost $12-$18 and some I have been using for six years with no issues (knock on wood). I figure if you ensure they are regulated, keep them cool, wire and ground them properly and never run them continuously over 80% even the cheaper ones will do the job.
  3. k6ccc

    Pixels in the visualizer (S4)

    What is the problem with IDs? Is your issue that you don't know what IDs to use, or how to assign them? I'll address the first, and then in a couple paragraphs, the second. You have a Pro level license, so you can use whatever IDs you want that makes sense to you. You did not say what hardware you are using. Some hardware has some special things to know about assigning IDs. For example, with Pixie controllers you configure the Pixie with the ID for the first string, and it then assigns the IDs for the remaining strings. For example, for a Pixie 16 controller, if you assigned it ID 05, the 16 strings would become IDs 05, 06, 07, 08 09, 0A, 0B, 0C, 0D, 0E, 0F, 10, 11, 12, 13, & 14 (remember that the IDs count in hexadecimal - not decimal). CCB / CCP controllers with two strings operate the same way when operating in "Dual Normal" mode - where you assign the ID for the first string, and it automatically configures the second string to the next ID (also in hex). My suggestion is to use a numbering scheme that makes sense to you. For example, I use three LOR networks (Regular, AuxA, & AuxB). Although you CAN duplicate controller ID numbers on different networks, I don't recommend doing so as it can be confusing to us human beings - the equipment doesn't care at all. In my case my Regular LOR network is allocated in my numbering plan to have controller IDs 01 - 1F, the AuxA network has controller IDs 11 - 1F, and my AuxB network is allocated controller ID 21 - 2F. In reality the regular network only has a single InputPup on it, and AuxA has five controllers. Both of those networks are used year round. AuxB is used for Christmas only and has three CCP controllers. For 2018, both AuxA and AuxB are getting more controllers. Now for the second possibility - you don't know how to assign them. That actually leads to a few more questions. Do you not know how to assign the IDs in the physical hardware, in the LOR software that is used for sequencing (Sequence Editor or Pixel Editor), or how to assign the IDs in Visualizer? And JR is right that a phone call can solve a lot of these issues in minutes that would take a novel worth of PMs or forum posts.
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